Category Archives: The John Ringling Library

The Ringling Art Library Summer Internship Experience

Hello everyone!  This is Sarah Burris, The Ringling Art Library summer intern.   I recently received my Master of Library and Information Science degree with a specialization in Museum Studies from Kent State University (Kent, Ohio).  I also have my Master of Fine Arts from the same university.  Having grown up in Florida, I have enjoyed being back in the sunshine especially in such beautiful surroundings!  My internship has consisted of a variety of fun projects: interlibrary loan, reference, collection development, digitization of rare John Ringling library portfolios, and planning ROAR! pre-story time activities.

Here are images of me leading the ROAR! group (click on image):

ROAR

I have really enjoyed digitizing the John Ringling rare portfolios.  I made several interesting discoveries. Both portfolios are available to view. While researching Peinture decorative : Panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie, the biggest challenge was finding Arthur Martin.  Arthur Martin (1801–1856) is attached to the cataloging information; however the portfolio was published 26 years after his death.  The two Arthur Martins were coincidentally both 19th century French artists.  Arthur Martin (1801-1856) was a Jesuit priest whose designs were medieval in stylization and largely religious.  The whimsical Neo-Louis XIV illustrations simply did not match up.  I finally located that the Arthur Martin Studio was based in Paris, France and in operation from 1860 to 1914 (Sue Kerry’s Neo-Classicism to Pop).  These illustrations would have been used to create decorative wall panel illustrations.

By happenstance, while researching Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur I discovered that a bracelet painted by Paul Victor Grandhomme matched an illustration within the portfolio.  The portfolio includes an illustrated plate of Diana the huntress, visible on previous post.  Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Paris, France) houses Bracelet Diane (1883) in their permanent collection.  The four sequential images at the bottom of the portfolio illustration correlate to the painted enamel of Bracelet Diane.

Click on image:
Diana the huntress

The 10-week summer internship at The Ringling Art Library has been a truly rewarding experience working with great mentors, building new skill sets, learning how The Ringling operates as a whole, and developing friendships.  I am very sad that this is the last week!

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The John Ringling Library : Rare Paul Grandhomme Portfolio

Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur.

Published:  Paris: A. Calavas, 1884
Contains 12 illustrated plates
Bequest of John Ringling, 1936

Diana The Huntress
View or download below:
Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur

Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur is part of the John Ringling library collection at The Ringling Art Library, and the second oversized portfolio from the collection to be digitized.  According to WorldCat, The Ringling Art Library has the only cataloged copy. Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur has recently had conservation work to the plates and portfolios.  The portfolio contains 12 illustrations applicable to enamel, stained glass, and ceramic arts by Paul Victor Grandhomme.  Paul Grandhomme (1851 – 1944) is most widely recognized for his skill as a French enamel painter in the late 19th and early 20th century.  Among his talents include Grandhomme’s tender depiction of mythological subjects and portraiture (Chishom, 367).

Enamel has a similar composition as glass when fused to metal, such as copper, through a heating process at high temperatures.  Enamel returned to fashion in the latter half of the 19th century pulling from medieval and Renaissance enamel processes (The New International Encyclopædia, 716).  In correlation to enamel returning to fashion, Renaissance Revival decorative arts also returned to fashion in Paris post-1840 (Campell, 265).  Grandhomme worked primarily in the Limoges School Revival manner following the Limoges painterly stylization of enamel portraiture originating in the Renaissance (Speel, 69).

Pierre Calmettes, artist/writer, provides a compelling description of Paul Grandhomme’s creative process within his 1903 article “La Pognée:  a new artistic society in Paris.” Grandhomme’s small Parisian flat was his workshop where he utilized the dining room area as his primary work space and the kitchen furnaces for baking the enamel.

“Preparing his pieces by means of drawings and sculpture, M. Grandhomme, in executing, employs a process which is all his own, his semi-transparent enamels giving a solidity of modeling to the flesh of his figures which cannot be obtained by the old methods of using translucent enamels (Calmettes, 538).”

Paul Grandhomme collaborated with several notable metalsmiths and enamellers including Alphonse Fouquet, Lucien Falize, Alfred Garnier, Jules Brateau, and Gustave Moreau.  Examples of completed collaborations are housed in institutions such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), Musée d’Orsay (Paris), and Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Paris).

If you would like to explore additional images of completed work by Paul Grandhomme:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Musée des Arts Décoratifs

Bibliography

Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur.  Paris:  A. Calavas, 1884.

Calmettes, Pierre.  “La Pognée:  a new artistic society in Paris.” The Architectural Record:  A Monthly Magazine of Architecture and the Allied Arts and Crafts.  Vol. 13.  New York:  The Architectural Record Co., 1903.

Campbell, Gordon ed.  The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. Vol 2, p. 265 New York, N.Y. : Oxford University Press, 2006.

Chishom, Hugh.  The Encyclopædia Britannica:  A dictionary of arts, sciences, literature and general information. Vol 9: Edwardes to Evangelical Association, p. 367. New York:  The Encyclopædia Britannica Company, 1910.

Fisher, Alexander.  “Portraits in Enamel.” The International Studio:  An Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art.  Vol 37. New York: New York Offices of the International Studio, 1909.

Speel, Erika.  Dictionary of Enamelling:  History and Techniques.  Brookfield, Vt. : Ashgate Publishing Limited, 1998.

Digitization of Dessins applicable à l’email, aux vitraux, aux arts ceramiques, etc. par Grandhomme, peintre-émailleur and correlating research has been completed by Ringling Art Library summer intern, Sarah Burris.

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The John Ringling Library: Rare Arthur Martin Portfolio

Peinture decorative : Panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie

Published: Paris: Ducher & Cie. 1882.
Contains 12 illustrated plates
Bequest of John Ringling, 1936

Martin_Painting

View or download below:
Peinture decorative : Panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie

Peinture decorative : Panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie is part of the John Ringling library collection at The Ringling Art Library. After his death, the portfolio was found in John Ringling’s walk-in closet on top of a bookshelf stacked with other oversized portfolios located in his personal office in Ca’d’Zan.

Sarah Burris, museum library intern for summer 2013, has begun digitizing portfolios from the John Ringling library collection. She chose to digitize Peinture decorative : panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie in part because that there are only three copies cataloged through Worldcat– The Ringling Museum of Art Library (Sarasota, FL US), Sächsische Landesbibliothek (Dresden, Germany), National Art Library Victoria and Albert Museum (London, UK). Digitization not only preserves the illustrated pages from future wear and tear, but it also allows for increased public accessibility. The book is now in the public domain having been published in 1882 and the copyright has not been renewed. The main reason she chose Peinture decorative for digitization is because the whimsical imagery from Arthur Martin’s Studio is simply too delightful not to be shared.

Peinture decorative contains twelve reproduced photographic plates of decorative mural illustrations on Bristol board. The panels were designed by the Arthur Martin Studio based in Paris, France, which was in operation from 1860 to 1914 (Kerry, 170). The Arthur Martin Studio produced Neo-Classical, also known as Neo-Louis XVI or French Third Republic, designs for decorative textiles, wallpapers, and paintings. Arthur Martin designs were popular in the late 19th century, especially patterns for woven silks produced by several large textile manufacturing companies including Maison Grand Frères and Mathevon et Vouvard (Kerry, 170). Examples of the woven designs are housed in renowned textile collections such as the Musée des Tissues (Lyon, France), Cummersdale Design Collection, and The Art Institute of Chicago.

This portfolio features six figures each representing the arts, the four seasons, and two decorative paintings for the top of a piano. The six allegorical female figures depict dance, music, painting, sculpture, lyric poetry, and astronomy. Putti iconography, vases with flowers, ornaments and architectural motifs often reoccur within the Arthur Martin designs (Bouzard, 63). The decorative paintings for the piano were commissioned by Monsieur Henri-August Fordinois (1830-1907), a Neo-Louis XVI furniture maker.

If you would like to explore additional images of work designed by the Arthur Martin Studio:

The Art Institute of Chicago
Lelievre Paris Fabric Collection
Cummersdale Design Collection Brochure

Bibliography:

Bouzard, Marie. La Soierie Lyonnaise du XVIIIe au XXe siècle dans les collections du musée des Tissues de Lyon. Lyon: Ed. Lyonnaises d’art et d’histoire : Société des Amis des musées de la Chambre de commerce, 1997.

Cercle de la librairie. Bibliographie de la France – Journal Général de l’imprimerie et de la librarie. Paris, France: Cercle de la librairie, 1881.

Kerry, Sue. Neo-Classicism to Pop: Part I – Late 18th & 19th Century Textiles. Easthampton, MA: Francesca Galloway, 2007.

Martin, A. Peinture décorative : Panneaux executés dans les ateliers de Arthur Martin et reproduits par la photographie. Paris: Ducher & Cie, 1882.

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